TLT Guest Blogger Gracie Cavnar Calls for a Boycott of School Lunch

by Bettina Elias Siegel on October 12, 2010

[Ed. Note:  It’s National School Lunch Week (I’m sure you had that on your calendar), yet we find ourselves with the child nutrition act stalled in Congress and underfunded even if it eventually passes.   To send a message to lawmakers, Recipe for Success founder Gracie Cavnar is calling for a national boycott of the school lunch program. Gracie’s guest post appears here, and tomorrow I’ll post my own thoughts about boycotts versus participation in the school lunch program: is it better to starve the beast, or feed it?  Gracie and I may not be in perfect agreement on all points, but we both clearly support the same end:  better school food, the elimination of junk food on school campuses, and healthier American school children.]

Celebrate National School Lunch Week with a Boycott!

Let Your Voice Be Heard

We can no longer sit by and watch our children’s health go down the drain for want of effective nutritional guidelines and quality execution of the school lunch program.  Let the power of the marketplace speak for itself.  I am calling on all parents to send a strong message to administrators and lawmakers by using the National School Lunch Week to boycott school lunches.

Childhood obesity is on the rise, lunch is an important part of a child’s daily nutrition, and National School Lunch Week is October 11-15, yet First Lady Michelle Obama’s child nutrition bill has stalled in Congress leaving school lunches underfunded and missing the mark on good nourishment. We have every right to expect the providers of our children’s school lunches to strive for health, but most fall dreadfully short.  What we get are dismal, monochrome  servings of salty, high-fat, processed food, without an appealing fresh fruit or vegetable in sight.  On top of that, our kids have to run the gamut through an overwhelming array of sweets and junk food that line the checkout isle. Citing funding issues and cost cutting measures, districts poor mouth us and point every way but to themselves.  In the meantime, companies like Revolution Foods are proving that delivering a high quality handmade school lunch with zero processed food is well within the economic reach of most.

Until school lunches get healthier and competing a-la-carte and vending machine junk foods are removed from the school cafeteria, I am urging parents to send a healthy lunch from home.

The RFS culinary team has provided suggestions for a week’s worth of healthy, fun and fresh 
lunches as part of the launch of our “Talking Seed-to-Plate” blog.  These options are affordable, colorful and tasty enough to tempt even the most finicky child.

Please join in the conversation and share your own tips and frustrations at http://www.recipe4success.org/seedtoplate/, where our team of professional chefs and educators will answer questions, and continue to post new menus and ideas for or engaging children in their own well being through activities in the kitchen and garden.

And if you live in Houston, plan to attendLunch Line,” a documentary presented by our friends at  www.thelunchtray.com in conjunction with Applegate Farms.

We must get control of this situation and save our children’s lives.  NOW.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

{ 2 trackbacks }

Previous post:

Next post: